Amphibian-Reptile Conservation
Amphibian-Reptile Conservation

Amphibian-Reptile Conservation

The amphibian and reptilian class of wildlife in Canada are among those frequently cited creatures that face the danger of becoming extinct.

Raccoons and some of their predators feed on their eggs, negatively impacting the biome. On top of that, unethical human activities such as poaching have greatly reduced their populace. Even climate change now poses a concerning threat to them. Additionally, commercial and industrial development has fragmented these species’ territory, leaving them prone to inbreeding.

To date, about 40 species of amphibian and reptile are classified as “Threatened” based on the latest report of COSEWIC or the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Therefore, an estimated portion of them requires the urgent practical need to survive.

To mitigate their risk of being extirpated, we have formed a campaign that concentrates on preserving and reestablishing the lives of amphibians and reptiles. The key components of this project are preservation breeding, conservation head-starting, on-site intervention, reintroduction, and translocation.

Moreover, we have created partnerships with several research groups to formulate the best approaches to conserving such species. We welcome volunteers to report any sightings of such species in specific locations. Lastly, we conduct educational workshops focusing on road safety, especially in places where roadkill and similar accidents involving these species are often reported.

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